Research on crowd behaviour

Some of the most important theories regarding crowd behaviour are as follows: The study of collective behaviour started with the study of crowd behaviour.

Research on crowd behaviour

Messenger Bad behaviour can spread quickly. In fact, contagion is one the most persuasive metaphors for explaining collective behaviour. It seems to capture something so fundamental in human behaviour that it is invoked to explain both the spread of simple behaviours like smiling and yawning, and more complex interactions such as the spread of ideas in society or rapid changes in financial markets.

But despite the apparent success of this metaphor, research evidence suggests that such language actually conceals more than it reveals. As such, there are better ways to think about and explain the process of influence among large groups of people.

Specifically, new research my colleagues and I have carried out on the August riots in England suggests the violence did not spread mindlessly. Our preliminary work on the riots that spread across English cities suggests social identity — rather than simple spontaneous contagion — shaped much of the behaviour that took place.

First of all, not everyone in the affected cities joined in.

Those that did shared an anti-police identity. Second, many of those young people who did join in would more typically have seen each other as rivals, based on long-standing conflicts between different districts of the city. We found that the shared antagonism towards the police meant that these rivalries became superseded by a stronger group identity.

The feeling of power this created among participants is what helped the riots grow and spread. Rioters shared an anti-police identity. In this early usage, we can see the defining features of the contagion concept and some of its problems. First, comparing social influence to a disease implies that influence in crowds is something bad.

Second, it suggests the spread is mindless, or even irrational, because it does not involve cognition. A new account Instead of a model of indiscriminate contagion to explain the way influence within and between crowds work, we need to use the notion of social identitywhich means our definition of ourselves based on our membership of groups.

Our group membership might change from context to context. For example, we might define ourselves as an Arsenal supporter in a football context and as as a Christian in a religious context.

This means different sources of influence can also vary according to the context. Psychologists have shown that this social identity principle helps explain the spread of relatively simple behaviour, such as emotional responses.

Crowd Behaviour Research Papers - plombier-nemours.com

For example, one study involved showing a group of psychology students images of people displaying anger and fear.ADVERTISEMENTS: Some of the most important theories regarding crowd behaviour are as follows: 1. Le Bon’s Theory 2. McDougall’s Theory 3.

Research on crowd behaviour

Freud’s Theory 4. Allport’s Theory 5. Turner’s Theory! The study of collective behaviour started with the study of crowd behaviour. In the 19th century, crowd behaviour was a significant area of study in the [ ]. From Le Bon’s perspective, this stampede is a classic example of crowd behaviour, where individuals lose their sense of self and responsibility by being anonymous members of a crowd, and are susceptible to contagion and suggestibility.

Reicher’s research into crowd behaviour has come up with three important features of crowd situations. Firstly, crowds nearly always involve more than one group.

This intergroup factor has been essentially ignored in the previous literature for crowd behaviour since the group mind fallacy.

Some of the most important theories regarding crowd behaviour are as follows: 1. Le Bon’s Theory 2. McDougall’s Theory 3. Freud’s Theory 4.

Allport’s Theory 5. Turner’s Theory! The study of collective behaviour started with the study of crowd behaviour. In the 19th century, crowd behaviour. Crowd psychology, also known as mob psychology, is a branch of social psychology.

Social psychologists have developed several theories for explaining the ways in which the psychology of a crowd differs from and interacts with that of the individuals within it. Stephen Reicher on Crowd Psychology. By Social Science Bites | Published: February 26, A lot of academic research can seem very esoteric, The real issue about crowd behaviour and crowd violence isn’t why a few people who came to be violent are violent, that’s a rather banal issue, it’s why so many people who came not to be violent.

Research on crowd behaviour
5 Most Important Theories Regarding Crowd Behaviour