Rewriting aesop fables

Students produce an original fable, using narrative target language.

Rewriting aesop fables

We tend to think of the crow in diametric ways. On the one hand, the crow is thought of as stupid and vain. Remember the Aesop's Fable about the crow with a piece of food in its beak? Praised by the wily fox, which wants to hear it sing, the crow opens its mouth and the fox walks away with the food.

At the other extreme, we think of the crow and the raven as inauspicious, gauche and even evil. A Sanskrit ditty makes fun of the crow saying when spring comes and birds start to sing, we tell the cuckoo apart from its look-alike, the crow Kakah krishna pikah krishna, ko bheda pikaka kakayoho, Vasanta samaye prapte kakah kakaha pikah pikaha.

Edgar Allen Poe wrote a dark poem on the raven, saying "And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming". Move to the world of science, and the crow and raven impress us with their thoughts and action.

It can tell apart a hunter with a gun from a farmer with a rake. And it can count, at least up to five.

If 3 hunters enter the grove and 2 leave, the crow keeps away, knowing that one is left. When there are 6 hunters and 5 leave, the crow returns assuming safety.

rewriting aesop fables

Of course crows snigger at the scarecrow we put up to shoo them away, and do so perching on it. Two years ago, zoologists at Oxford University found that the crow can make tools. They left some meat in a small toy bucket inside a tall cylinder, into which the crow could not reach to get the food.

The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse: 1: The Wind and the Sun: 2: The Wolf and the Kid: 2. Moreover, by creatively rewriting Aesop's fable, the text itself illustrates not only how art is work but how art contains the power to renew itself. By including the grasshopper's response to the original moral, the authors push the debate further. Aesop's Fables: Books about Reading, Writing, and Thinking by Royal Fireworks Press - Publishers for gifted and talented children.

What it actually did was to pick up a piece of stiff wire left nearby by the experimentersbent it into a hockey-stick shape by tapping ever-so-rightly against a surface and lifted the bucket using this hook and partook of the meal! The Oxford experiment is, in a way, a retelling of the Panchatantra tale, where the thirsty crow drops pebble after pebble into a pot of water to raise the level and drink.

It also points out for us that tool making is not an ability that only we humans have. Jane Goodall showed that chimpanzees are toolmakers, and now we find that animals well below the primate or mammal level are smart and creative too. Readers may also recall how a soft-drink company did a take-off on the thirsty crow tale in their advertisement.

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They show two crows; one of them keeps dropping pebbles to raise the liquid level in a glass tumbler. As it is doing this, the second crow taps the wall of the tumbler with its beak and drinks off the soft drink spraying out of the crack on the wall!

This crow is not just smart but is also wily. To think is one thing; to deceive is going a step higher. It involves analysing consequences, weighing options and judging the other party.

The crow in the soft drink ad exemplifies this aspect. In the Oxford experiment where Betty the crow fashions the hook to lift the food basket to retrieve the meat, her male partner Abel, rather than making a tool himself, saw Betty bending the wire and stole the food from her three times.

In this connection, some recent experiments reported by Drs. Thomas Bugnyar and Kurt Kotrschal of the University of Vermont on how crows practice deception are interesting and instructive. Writing in the April issue of Animal Cognition, they first point out that at the cognitive level, types of deception refer to different mental processes that are supposed to underlie responses.

Apart from the trivial case of pre-programmed responses, we need to ask what the intention of the deceiver is, and whether it is to affect the other's behaviour, or to affect the other's mind. Often the other individual is known to behave in a particular way in a given situation.

This knowledge is sufficient for the deceiver to create acts to alter this behaviour. However, for altering the minds of others, the deceiver must be aware of the perception of others, or what others see. This capability of mental perspective analysis, or to know what others see, is of a higher order.

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It has until now been normally thought to be the province of humans or at best primates.Writing fables teaches students to recognize and apply a predictable, concise narrative structure to original stories. Use this easy lesson plan for writing a fable. Perhaps the best known creator of many of the fables read and discussed today, Aesop was a sixth-century Greek slave.

Aesop's Fables, or the Aesopica, is a collection of fables credited to Aesop, a slave and storyteller believed to have lived in ancient Greece . Moreover, by creatively rewriting Aesop's fable, the text itself illustrates not only how art is work but how art contains the power to renew itself.

rewriting aesop fables

By including the grasshopper's response to the original moral, the authors push the debate further. Students read the original Aesop fables and then rewrite a fable using modern language in a modern setting.

Objectives Students will work as a class to translate one of Aesop's fables into a modern setting and modern language. Aug 21,  · How to Write a Fable. Fables are short allegorical tales that typically feature anthropomorphic animal characters, though plants, objects, and natural forces may also appear as characters.

In classic fables, the main character learns from 75%(27). Aesop's Fables: Books about Reading, Writing, and Thinking by Royal Fireworks Press - Publishers for gifted and talented children.

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